Popcornflix Updates Roku Numbers, Eyes Expansion

Originally published as Popcornflix Announces Roku Download Numbers on Technorati Entertainment

popcornflix - free streaming moviesAccording to the most recent announcement, the free streaming movie platform Popcornflix, has surpassed 400,000 downloads on Roku. Since that announcement the company has updated the tally and now claims 500,000 downloads (as of Monday August 8th), which means it added around 100k in the past 30 days or so.  This puts it just behind the big players in the space, Hulu, Netlfix, Amazon to name a few.

 

There is one difference, well a couple, that make Popcornflix unique and compelling. Once is the price, it’s free. With an ad supported streaming movie model, it doesn’t ask users to pay a monthly fee like Hulu, or pay per episode or season like other streaming video services. The other is movie rights, Popcornflix parent company is Screen Media Ventures, LLC, and with distribution rights spanning digital, the company decided about a year and a half ago to leverage digital distribution to reach viewers directly. The company launched a year ago and hopped on the Roku platform about 6-months ago, even though Screen Media Ventures, LLC has  been in operation for the past 13 years.

In an article in GigaOM, Gary Delfiner, SVP of Screen Media Ventures, LLC, the parent company of Popcornflix said, “We don’t have huge movies, we have good movies”. The library of movies gives users a fast and easy way to view hundreds of theatrically released titles and indie films, even if some have categorized the offerings as being in the ‘so-bad-it’s-good category’. But this hasn’t stopped movie lovers from tuning in, and the company has plans to venture into other markets as well, most recently expanding to the UK and Canada.

In an email exchange, Delfiner updated the number of Roku downloads and also stated the company will be expanding aggressively in the connected TV market and are currently in talks with major electronics manufacturers toward that end. The company also has plans to expand to all English speaking countries as well as Germany, France, Russia, Latin America, and Brazil.

To download the free Popcornflix iOS app click here.

To learn more about Screen Media Ventures click here.

About Geoff Simon

Geoff is owner/operator of Simon Search Marketing. He graduated cum laude with a B.S. in Business Administration from California State Polytechnic University in 2003. Geoff immediately secured employment as an account coordinator with Grey Direct West, (now G2 Direct & Digital) working for Bank of Americas online banking division. From there Geoff has worked in a search marketing capacity for companies including Intermark Group, Disney Interactive Media Group, and Toyota Dealers Association. During his time Geoff has worked on brands including Disney Family, Toyota, Lexus, National Geographic, Red Bull USA Events, That '70s Show and Carsey Werner.
Geoff likes ice-hockey, is a Chicago native and proud dad to his almost 1-year old son Cyrus.
Find Geoff on Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, or follow his Twitter handle @geoff_simon

Comments

  1. Popcornflix Updates Roku Numbers, Eyes Expansion http://t.co/vjEvf3tx

  2. If some one wants expert view regarding blogging after that
    i suggest him/her to go to see this website, Keep up the nice job.

  3. that it won’t talk through LinkSys hdaawrre sorry, not true.VERY happy with this device. Embarrassingly close to euphoric, in fact, simply because of it’s configuration and connectivity capabilities alone! The fact that it connected so quickly and so incredibly on my network is reason enough for me to own this thing. Let alone how cool it is to actually use, watch and enjoy, the very reason you get one in the first place!However, I simply must also add these additional review details:The box itself is very small, the size of a small jewelry box, and blended right in with my home theater system. It’s even pleasing to the eye to some degree, not the typical mess of cables you’d expect. It takes up virtually no shelf space and only has two cables connected to it if you’re using wireless and HDMI: the HDMI cable itself and the power cord. That’s it. The remote control itself is VERY small, be careful, it will slip down between couch cusions VERY easily. But it’s very nice looking and very stupid-simple to operate, having only a few buttons for menu and playback control. The simplicity of the thing is so beautiful compared to the typical slap a million buttons on it for cool factor we’re inundated with these days that I’m darned close to taking the thing out to dinner and a movie.The device is extremely simple to use, no tech savvy-ness required. You will absolutely LOVE the simplicity of it. It is so amazingly simple that I’m going to risk sounding like an idiot by calling it an engineering masterpiece. And trust me when I say that I know technology. As much as I like to go full-blown geek on most things, this device is so refreshingly simple that I’m surprised at such a device can be so simple. I’m also surprised at myself for being so thrilled with it.The included directions that come with it are incredibly simple. However, the device is so simple to hook up and use, I’d offer that the included quick-start instructions aren’t even necessary.My Roku is hooked up to a 52 Samsung HDTV at 1080p. The picture quality of the streamed content over the Roku is very impressive for a 720P device streaming compressed internet media content. Please understand that compression is required for internet streaming, and that you will notice some fuzz in the picture, especially if you have a big HDTV. That’s the nature of internt streaming, and is not because of any shortcoming of the Roku product itself.Even though the Roku has true HD mode, do not expect crystal clear HD content remember, this device hooks up to ANY TV, not just HD. Imagine slightly better quality regualr TV on a giant screen. That’s how it is watching a Roku on an HDTV, especially a big one, even with the Roku’s HD display feature enabled. The menus are crystal clear in HD the actual streaming media content you’ll be watching will not be, it’s like watching slightly enhanced regualr TV, at least on large TVs. On smaller TVs, 32 and smaller, it will look fantastic.And the question many of you are wodnering: What if you will be using the Roku simultaneously with other computes or devices in your home on the same internet conenction? Simple: use common sense. You’ll have no problems if all you’re doing is email and web browsing while watching thigns on the Roku box. Online gaming and downloading giant files, however, might cause the Roku to kick picture quality down or pause for buffering or even stop it dead in its tracks altogether. I have had no problems whatsoever so far, but I make sure to keep computer use to light duty while watching content over the Roku. Use a little common sense and you’ll have no problems. Surprisingly, it does a lot better than I thought it would.Critical: for wireless use, the Roku needs to be at Wireless-G or higher. If you have a PDA or older laptop that only does Wireless-A or B, and your internet router is in mixed mode (allows A, B, G and N), most wireless routers/access points will kick down in speed to match the slowest device talking to it. This will basically stop the Roku dead in its tracks by pretty much dropping it’s access to the itnernet down to virtually nothing. Don’t use old slow wireless-A/B products if you’re using your Roku wirelessly.The most economical entertainment under the sun: NetFlix is only $10 a month, but you must understand that the Roku will only play the movies that NetFlix has made available in their watch now category, and that category really isn’t all that impressive. Most NetFlix titles are still DVD-by-mail-only, so their entire catolog is not available to the Roku player. However, Amazon’s On-Demand service, though it is pay-per-view and much more expensive at 1-3$ per movie viewing, has over 45,000 titles you can watch immediately on the Roku. Either way you go, this is an incredible entertainment system. As for me personally, we’re subscribed to NetFlix and watch the occasional Amazon On-Demand title when a new release comes out we want to see. All total, we’re probably spending no more than $20 a month to watch what we want to watch and when we want to watch it. This is at about 25-30% of a normal cable bill, and all while providing convenience, content and flexibility that cable or satellite can’t even (currently) dream of. You just can’t beat it.This is how all cable and satellite service content will eventually be delivered. Until then, you get it all right now with the Roku.And if you don’t have Wireless-N in your home yet, and you’re thinking about saving $10 and getting the lesser model, just get this one you’re going to soon have Wireless-N in your home anyway, so get it right the first time. Otherwise you’ll just end up buying this model later anyway.Also, this Roku box, when first plugged in, will download an update and then reboot itself. Afterwards, you will see the main menu for the first time and be pleasantly surprised to find that not only are NetFlix and Amazon On-Demand available to the Roku, but also several other music and video streaming services, such as Pandora, a NBL (baseball) streaming service, and several other trial services.All surprises with this box were pleasant, no bad experiences, failures or complaints whatsoever.I want to finish this review with the following statement: This by far dead serious the best $130 I have ever spent in my life. Bang for buck, I have never seen anything provide such incredible high-quality entertainment in such a well-engineered way in such an attractive, small, easy-to-use package. If you ever wanted to see magic in a little box, thsi is the product. Not often you get to see cool things like this come along, but here’s a real winner of an example. Roku is misnamed. It should be Kudos .

Speak Your Mind Cancel reply

*